Review of The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

34076952The Language of Thorns 

By Leigh Bardugo

Published September 26th 2017

Rating 5/5 leafs

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I like my reviews to be little leaflets of information about the book, a list of things to be prepared for so you can get to reading. I also want reading to be an experience so at the end I’ll list some things I think would pair well with this book

Synopsis from Goodreads

Love speaks in flowers. Truth requires thorns.

Travel to a world of dark bargains struck by moonlight, of haunted towns and hungry woods, of talking beasts and gingerbread golems, where a young mermaid’s voice can summon deadly storms and where a river might do a lovestruck boy’s bidding but only for a terrible price.

Inspired by myth, fairy tale, and folklore, #1 New York Times–bestselling author Leigh Bardugo has crafted a deliciously atmospheric collection of short stories filled with betrayals, revenge, sacrifice, and love.

Perfect for new readers and dedicated fans, these tales will transport you to lands both familiar and strange—to a fully realized world of dangerous magic that millions have visited through the novels of the Grishaverse.

This collection of six stories includes three brand-new tales, all of them lavishly illustrated with art that changes with each turn of the page, culminating in six stunning full-spread illustrations as rich in detail as the stories themselves.

Overview

This was an amazing reading experience. From the excellently packaged book (both the dust jacket and hard cover were gorgeous) to the lovely illustrations, to the stories. The Language of Thorns will suck you into the magical Grisha world even deeper.

“This goes to show you that sometimes the unseen is not to be feared and that those meant to love us most are not always ones who do.” – The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo

What To Expect

compound_pathMagical

This short story collection is very interesting because it is supposed to be the folk tales that the characters in Bardugo’s Grisha world would have heard as children. Much like we heard Hansel and Gretel and The Nutcracker, these are the tales that were told to them.

compound_path Recognizable

I very much enjoy reading Leigh Bardugo’s Grisha worlds because they are high fantasies that take place on a grand scale, dealing with different countries. It is interesting to see what elements of our world she takes and puts into her books. It is no different with these tales. It is easy to see that all of these stories are re-imaginings of tales that we heard growing up. Leigh said about them that she would find questions about the original tales that bothered her and write her stories as an answer. For example, she asked of Hansel and Gretel what kind of father would permit the witch to send the children out twice?

compound_path Illustrated

Each tale begins with just one small illustration in the margins of the page. With each page, a new detail is illustrated into the margins to add more to the picture in the reader’s mind. At the end, when the margins are all filled in, each tale has a beautiful full portrait.

“We were not made to please princes.” – The Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo


Recommended

The first thing you need to do after finishing this book is definitely go read her other books. Six of Crows is one of my favorites! I NEED to finish the series with Crooked Kingdom.23437156

It would also be a fun idea to get into some of the original versions of the fairy tales like watching Beauty and the Beast or the Nutcracker.

 

Let’s chat! Tell me what you think about this book. How essential to you is it for book covers to be pretty? I find that the older I get, the more I want the covers to be beautiful. Am I vain for that? I have no idea! I want the story to have substance of course but the compelling cover never hurts.

Thank you for reading!

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About Leah

Hi! I'm Leah. I like books, TV, and plants. I love writing about it all. Earnest Hemmingway said "Write hard and clear about what hurts," and I aspire to do just that. Thanks for reading!

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